Price Guide: The Average Rent in Seattle

Looking for the average rent in Seattle? See our resource to assist you in uncovering the cost of living in the emerald city.

From Pike Place Market and the iconic Space Needle to its famous coffee culture, Seattle is an innovative, exciting, and thriving city. Located between the Puget Sound and the Cascade Mountain Range, it also offers an incredible bounty of outdoor activities for the nature enthusiasts in the group.

If you’re considering a move to one of America’s most beloved cities, you’re more than likely curious about the average rent in Seattle and which neighborhood is a fit for you.

Let’s take a closer look at the Seattle rent prices across the different neighborhoods and focus on some house-hunting tips to help you make your big move. Whatever it is that brings you to Seattle—work, coffee, the thrill of the Pacific Northwest—we know you’ll find the perfect place to call home.

Average Rent in Seattle Neighborhoods

Before you find your Seattle apartment, it’s always a good plan to get to know the rental prices. Rent Cafe posted a comprehensive list featuring the average rent in Seattle, which was updated in February 2020. It found that the average rent for an apartment in Seattle is $2,169—a 6% increase compared to the past year.

As Seattle rent prices rise, no need to fear. In fact, potential renters are finding there is still a bounty of neighborhoods to choose from. Whether you’re looking for a studio in Belltown or a one-bedroom apartment in South Lake Union, there are thankfully plenty of options to choose from in the rental market.

Based on the information that Rent Cafe gathered, let’s take a look at the average rent in Seattle, Washington in various neighborhoods. In this list, you’ll find more affordable options—like The Highlands, Richmond Beach, and Woodmont—at the top with the more expensive options—like Central Waterfront, Pike Market, and Belltown—at the bottom.

Keep in mind, there are tons of neighborhoods in Seattle, each with their own unique charm and appeal.

The Highlands

$1,354

Richmond Beach

$1,354

Innis Arden

$1,354

Rainier View

$1,383

Zenith

$1,453

Woodmont

$1,453

South Des Moines

$1,453

Redondo

$1,453

Pacific Ridge

$1,453

North Central Des Moines

$1,453

Marina District

$1,453

Central Des Moines

$1,453

North Hill

$1,479

South Park

$1,520

Georgetown

$1,520

Ridgecrest

$1,585

North City

$1,585

Briarcrest

$1,585

Ballinger

$1,585

Richmond Highlands

$1,625

Hillwood

$1,625

Highland Terrace

$1,625

Broadview

$1,625

Echo Lake

$1,637

Victory Heights

$1,637

Pinehurst

$1,637

Olympic Hills

$1,637

Cedar Park

$1,637

Haller Lake

$1,642

Westminster Triangle

$1,649

Parkwood

$1,649

Meridian Park

$1,649

Bitter Lake

$1,649

North Beach – Blue Ridge

$1,657

Crown Hill

$1,657

Meadowbrook

$1,726

Matthews Beach

$1,726

Maple Leaf

$1,726

Rainier Beach

$1,756

North Beacon Hill

$1,779

Fauntleroy

$1,786

Arbor Heights

$1,786

North College Park

$1,828

Greenwood

$1,832

Atlantic

$1,841

South Beacon Hill

$1,842

Mid-Beacon Hill

$1,842

Holly Park

$1,842

Columbia City

$1,842

South Delridge

$1,842

Riverview

$1,842

Highland Park

$1,842

Harbor Island-Industrial District

$1,842

Wedgwood

$1,857

View Ridge

$1,857

Sand Point

$1,857

Roosevelt

$1,857

Roxhill

$1,861

North Delridge

$1,861

High Point

$1,861

Southeast Magnolia

$1,863

Lawton Park

$1,863

Briarcliff

$1,863

Mount Baker

$1,873

Whittier Heights

$1,881

Loyal Heights

$1,881

Gatewood

$1,894

Fairmount Park

$1,894

Seward Park

$1,895

Dunlap

$1,895

Brighton

$1,895

Windermere

$1,902

Ravenna

$1,902

Bryant

$1,902

Stevens

$1,916

Madison Park

$1,916

Harrison – Denny Blaine

$1,916

University District

$1,935

Laurelhurst

$1,935

Montlake

$1,966

Green Lake

$1,968

Portage Bay

$1,979

North Admiral

$1,989

Genesee

$1,989

Wallingford

$1,999

Broadway

$2,031

Leschi

$2,034

Seaview

$2,035

Junction

$2,040

Alki

$2,040

Mann

$2,049

Interbay

$2,050

Sunset Hill

$2,061

Minor

$2,062

Madrona

$2,062

Phinney Ridge

$2,084

West Woodland

$2,084

Ballard

$2,084

International District

$2,087

West Queen Anne

$2,089

Yesler Terrace

$2,094

Fremont

$2,100

Pioneer Square

$2,155

First Hill

$2,336

Eastlake

$2,394

North Queen Anne

$2,425

Lower Queen Anne

$2,425

Westlake

$2,500

South Lake Union

$2,500

East Queen Anne

$2,500

Seattle Central Business District

$2,531

Central Waterfront

$2,596

Pike Market

$2,714

Belltown

$2,714

Tips for Seattle House Hunting

As you’ll find on your search for housing, Seattle rent prices vary greatly between the neighborhoods. Before you start on your search, it’s a good idea to know exactly what you’re looking for in a living situation. Sit down with your notepad, a pen, and take some time to muse over the questions below.

Size of the Space

The good thing about researching typical rents in Seattle — compared to, say, the average rent in San Francisco or average rent in New York City — is that you’ll get some more square footage than you might in other cities. The desired size of an apartment is different for every renter. Some people might have kids or a dog and need more space to spread out. Others might be living solo, and a 400 square foot apartment may do just fine. Decide on a range of square footage you’ll be comfortable with, then go from there.

East or West Side

The east and west sides of Seattle are divided by beautiful Lake Washington, which is the second-largest natural lake in Washington State. While you research Seattle rent prices, it’s helpful to consider which side of the lake you prefer. The west side has more of that downtown city feel to it, with busy pedestrian walkways, skyscrapers, and apartment buildings. For some of us, this is just the ticket to the excitement and creative energy of city living. The east, which includes places like Kirkland and Redmond, offers a more suburban feel than its westside counterpart.

Public Transportation

When you’re thinking about the average rent in Seattle and what you’re willing to pay for an apartment, consider public transportation and the apartment’s distance from public transportation. There’s not a super-advanced subway system in Seattle like there is in some other big cities, but there is reliable bus transportation that runs through all the major areas of the city. Many renters chose to bring a car along with them for their move to Seattle, but like any city, there can be rush hour, congestion, and traffic. If this is something you’d like to avoid, check out the walkable neighborhoods (of which there are plenty).

Green Space

Seattle is home to 485 parks and natural areas. If green space is important to you, consider checking out the Magnolia neighborhood. In it, you’ll find the city’s largest public park, Discovery Park, which contains 11.81 miles of walking trails and 534 total acres. There’s also Carkeek Park, which spans 216 acres and is located in the Broadview neighborhood. Once you equate the lush bounty of parks that the Pacific Northwest offers into your average apartment rent, Seattle looks pretty good than some of its fellow cities.

Explore

Whether you’re interested in the average rent in Boston or the average rent in Seattle, Washington, when you’re considering a big move, it’s always a good idea to explore the area. Put on your favorite walking shoes and spend the afternoon browsing the coffee shops, local parks, and bookstores. This will give you a feel for what the residents and the vibe are like to see if it’s your kind of scene. If you’re relocating without physically visiting the area, check out the street views on Google maps. They’ll give you a good feel for what a stroll around your soon-to-be neighborhood will feel like.

Zeus Seattle Listings

If you’re coming to Seattle and looking for a long term rental, check out the Zeus Seattle furnished rentals. Forego the stress of moving into an empty space and instead, settle into one of our thoughtfully furnished rentals. From downtown studios to apartments in South Lake Union, we have something for every sort of Seattle house hunter.

Not only do we offer affordable Seattle rent prices in hip neighborhoods, but we ensure that every rental comes fully equipped and ready for you to move in.

  • All utilities are included with your stay, including 100 mbps WiFi and HD TV.
  • Self check-in makes arrival a breeze—we’ll give you a secure code to use, then the house is yours.
  • When it comes to safety, we maintain the highest hygiene standards, so you can rest assured that your space is as clean as can be.
  • All this, plus everyday essentials (like smart cable TV, premium linens, top-rated mattress, and an on-site washer and dryer), means all you have to do is show up and settle in.

We know researching the average rent in Seattle and trying to fine-tune where you fit in can be a stressful task at first. And whether you’re choosing to stay with Zeus or putting down roots somewhere else, we hope this article has eased your rental anxieties and helped you feel excited for the journey ahead.